Most die-hard driving purists would prefer to not have a convertible roof. Convertible tops not only add weight but reduce structural rigidity, making them technically worse to drive. However, sometimes, in the right circumstances, what convertibles add to the experience—more engine/exhaust noise, wind in your hair, and the smells and sights of the environment—can make them better. In the case of the G83 M4 Convertible, is it at its best in Spain? Joe Achilles took on the chore of finding out.

YouTuber Joe Achilles had the chance to drive the G83 M4 Convertible through some stunning Spanish countryside and, if you’re wondering whether the convertible is fun enough, it’s a great video to watch. Achille has owned both the M3 Competition and M3 Competition xDrive, so he’s a good judge of M3/M4 character.

So is the BMW M4 Convertible better once you can put it in the right environment? Well, yes and no. Of course, it’s better in the sunshine, when you can feel the sun’s warmth, smell the gorgeous nature around you, and hear its thunderous exhaust, all unencumbered by a roof. However, it’s still a big ole boat. The BMW M4 is heavy as it is, weighing dangerously close to two tons. With the added power folding roof mechanisms and additional structural bracing, to deal with its lack of roof, it crests the two-ton mark. Add three adults and it’s almost two and a half tons. So despite its S58 firepower, it doesn’t feel anywhere near as quick as its siblings. Plus that weight makes it a bit sluggish in corners, where you can feel its heft and its tires trying to cheat physics. But physics always wins.

bmw m4 convertible frozen portimao blue 08 830x552

Then there’s the lack of rigidity. Admittedly, on perfectly smooth Spanish roads, the M4 Convertible probably feels pretty solid. However, hit a few nasty bumps and you’ll feel the scuttle shake, as the chassis flexes from the lack of a roof structure. The steering wheel will vibrate, the dash will creek, and the whole interior will feel like it flexes. Admittedly, those are minor, and shouldn’t turn you off from buying the car on their own, however, they issues that do arise with the M4 Convertible.

Overall, is the BMW M4 Convertible worth getting? If you live in the right environment, and aren’t lugging around several passengers regularly, then probably. It’s drop-top cruising experience is probably lovely in the right weather. However, everyone else should stick to the coupe.