BMW had yet another record-breaking year in 2019 and managed to beat all expectations, posting a 4.4 percent sales increase. The German brand expects 2020 to be even better as some of its models are just beginning to make their presence known. At least that seems to be the spirit in the US, where BMW’s arm is doing better than usual lately and seems to have big plans for the near future.

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In a recent meeting with dealer representatives, Shaun Bugbee, Executive Vice-President of operations told Automotive News there’s an upward momentum to be taken advantage of right now. “If I look at 2019, we had a real momentum in the market after Q1,” he said “That momentum is driven by product. We feel we have our mix in the right spot between cars and crossovers,” he added. “We expect to grow more than the premium segment. The goal will be to gain market share.”

BMW X6 M50i 1 830x467

That’s a bold claim and an ambitious goal, no matter how you look at it. Some are even saying the market is shrinking and that buying habits are rapidly changing but the sales figures recorded by BMW in the last few years seem to contradict those claims. The company has been posting yearly increases for the last 7 years and continues to do so. The German brand will be relying on its new models a lot as well as the refreshed ones.

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This year the Bavarian company will have 12 new models on sale in the US. Some of them are models launched last year but now just reaching dealers while others will be brand new, launched throughout 2020. We can look forward to the new X6 starting to reach its potential, the new 4 Series, or the facelifted 5 Series.

In order to get the numbers up, BMW pledged to invest more in marketing, to create more buzz around the brand, per BMW National Dealer Forum Chairman, Patrick Womack: “There has been a commitment from BMW that they’re going to create more noise around the brand and drive people to our stores.” Considering the growth BMW recorded in the US last year was 4.4 percent, beating that number will be a tough challenge.