VIDEO: 2009 BMW E92 335i reviewed by Regular Car Reviews

3-Series, News, Videos | March 14th, 2017 by 9
Alpine White BMW E92 335i Gets A Suspension Update 2 750x500

BMW drivers typically get a bad rep, as they are known for not using their turn signal, driving aggressively and ultimately driving like jerks (a …

BMW drivers typically get a bad rep, as they are known for not using their turn signal, driving aggressively and ultimately driving like jerks (a harsher word is usually used but this is a classy site). These topics are discussed while driving the BMW E92 335i by Regular Car Reviews.

In this video, we take a look at the E92 335i, its N54 engine and some of its oddities, as well as some of the things that make it great. For starters, the press release of the car back in the day seemed to have been trying to convince people of how BMW-like the E92 was, which BMW could have done by just letting people drive it. Mr. Regular really rips the 335i’s press release for being repetitive and redundant with its superlatives. However, to be fair, almost all press releases are like this, as they’re job is to try and talk new products up. So it’s a bit of an empty criticism.

Capture 31 750x334

Mr. Regular also talks about the wonky turn signals, the strange throttle pedal and the difficulty in working on the engine. The turn signals are weird from this era of BMW, as they return back to center and have no detents through their travel, which makes them weird to use and could be the reason why many BMW drivers don’t use their turn signal. I must add, though, that the new G30-gen 5 Series has gotten rid of these turn signals and has gone back to the regular old-school style of turn signal and I’m so grateful for it.

The pedal travel is also weird, though, as the first half of the pedal seems to have no response. Though, the specific car Mr. Regular drove had an engine tune and the throttle pedal is electronic so the tune could have something to do with that. If any E92 335i owners could comment on this, that’d be great.

He does say that it’s very fast, nice to dive and very comfortable, though. He compares this xDrive model to the Subaru WRX STI, which has a bit of a bad reputation for being a car that young teenagers with “illest” stickers on their backward hats drive. He says that the E92 335i xDrive is not only faster than the Subaru but is far better to drive, still capable in snow and dirt, looks way better and has a much better brand image to it.

The E92 335i does have its faults and isn’t a perfect car.Overall, though, it seems like the E92 335i is a great car to own, as it provides a ton of speed, great tuning ability and a great driving car for a good price.

9 responses to “VIDEO: 2009 BMW E92 335i reviewed by Regular Car Reviews”

  1. Eric Leonard says:

    I don’t really get how the turn signals are so bad. I LOVE the turn signals on my E90. When I drive a “normal” car now, I get aggravated by them. There really is only a learning curve for old men and idiots.

    • I actually agree with you. When I first used them, it took me about four seconds to realize how to use them and then it was easy. Yet somehow, it’s such a common complaint. I must admit, though, I do like the new G30’s turn signals better, which are more normal but still have the three-blink feature.

      • Eric Leonard says:

        So, instead of just blinking once on a tap, they blink three times, but stay in an up or down for lengthy turns? I haven’t driven a G30 yet. Seems like that would be logical, though.

        • Yes, there are two detents like usual, the first for three blinks and that returns to center, but the second stays in its up or down position so you can physically push it back.

  2. Crux says:

    Verified Owner: I have in the garage a 2010 E92 335i 6spd.

    Mr. Reg just blabs on about the press release. Annoying af.
    I have no idea wtf he’s talking about when it comes to the throttle pedal? Mines is responsive.
    The turn signal lever. No it is not a legitimate evidence that the turn signal is weird or bad. He’s wrong imo.
    I like using the turn signal and consider myself a polite lane changer. I actually love the way it does not click. I Love how you can just push down or up lightly. I don’t want/need to Lock the lever down or up when changing lanes on the freeway. Your speeding through and just want a polite 2-3 flashes when your switching lanes.

    It’s a fun car to whip about and be a hooligan w/o worrying of damage. E92 M3, I worry of what others drivers around me might do. Like ding your door at Costco. This car is just well balance in a lot of areas & its so tuner friendly. Yes, inside the bonnet BMW makes it impossible to work on your engine. But it is what it is. For a low budget poor man’s M3, interior wind noise is quiet compared to newer cars I’ve driven. #1 pet peeve exterior noise filtering through cabin. E92 335i is comfy and quiet for its class imo.

    • Thank you for sharing, I suspected the custom tune had something to do with the poor throttle response in this video, along with the fact that it was an automatic and could be holding on to higher gears for efficiency purposes. Thanks for sharing and great car.

  3. Lizzmay says:

    What an annoying video to try and watch. I had to cut it short. I own an 07. Spark plugs are easier to change than in a V6 front driver. I’ve done it so I know. Brakes are easy to change. Car is Dinan tuned and obscenely quick with great fuel economy. Simply the best all-around auto money can buy. And rwd is all that is required with snow tires for the winter. And the signals are just fine; a soft touch for 3 flashes and a harder push to leave them on.

  4. […] across, they can be quite useful. For example, when you want to show just how far you can take a BMW E92 335i in terms of performance, using a well-established car as a rival on the other side of the drag […]

  5. […] across, they can be quite useful. For example, when you want to show just how far you can take a BMW E92 335i in terms of performance, using a well-established car as a rival on the other side of the drag […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

NEWSLETTER