2017 BMW i3 94 Ah Gets Official EPA Ratings

BMW i | August 11th, 2016 by 7
2017 BMW i3 5 750x500

The official EPA ratings for the revised 2017 BMW i3 are finally in. According to the EPA, the higher capacity BMW i3 (94 Ah/33 kWh …

The official EPA ratings for the revised 2017 BMW i3 are finally in. According to the EPA, the higher capacity BMW i3 (94 Ah/33 kWh battery) returns 123.8 miles in electric city driving and 101.9 on the highway. The combined electric-only range is listed at 114 miles. All three figures are a significant improvement over the 60 Ah version (22 kWh battery) of the i3, which is listed with a city range of 89 miles, a highway range of 71.6 miles and a combined range of only 81 miles.

The EPA ratings for the 94 Ah version of the BMW i3 REx have yet to be released.

EPA rating 2017 BMW i3

As previously reported, the BMW i3 received a serious update this summer. The most important change will be the introduction of a denser battery pack that is now rated at 94Ah instead of the i3’s previous 60Ah. That will offer customers a longer range and will free some of them from the well-known phenomenon called ‘range anxiety’. Of course, all of it will come at a price, the new model starting at $44,595 which is $1,200 more than the old version.

2017 BMW i3 4 750x562

As for the performance, excluding the extended range, the i3’s numbers remain the same. In its pure EV guise, the car accelerates to 62 mph from standstill in 7.2 seconds thanks to its 170 HP and 184 lb-ft (250 Nm) of torque. The Range Extender version does the same in 7.9 seconds but will make sure the phrase ‘range anxiety’ disappears from your vocabulary forever. For this to happen though, you’ll have to pay $3,850 extra, getting the starting price of the i3 up to $48,445, before any tax incentives.

[Source: InsideEVs]

7 responses to “2017 BMW i3 94 Ah Gets Official EPA Ratings”

  1. Sander says:

    Disappointing BMW lowers itself to using Ah instead of kWh to appear in the same league of Tesla.

    • AnonymousEngineer says:

      Not really – I’ve worked with battery banks for off-grid power, and pretty much every battery in existence has its energy storage capacity rated in Ah, with the battery rated at a certain voltage (e.g. 12V/80Ah is a pretty standard sized VRLA battery).

      This whole kWh thing that Tesla made popular is actually the anomaly, not the norm.

      • Sander says:

        Yes, you are right wrt batteries, but:

        Every brand uses kWh in their battery specs, BMW did too with the first i3 and i8, and they still do in their PHEV series. This makes sense as mileage is measured in and shown as kWh/100km (in i3 too). Btw, BMW only gives kWh in their online specs, no V or Ah.

        And BMW does not specify voltage at first sight, which makes their Ah number useless. I’m not 100% but I believe not all brands have the same voltage, which, again, makes
        Ah in specs much less useful than kWh. For example, C Evolution is 133V, and i3 apparently 353V?

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  4. […] BMW’s i3 faces little competition from its traditional German rivals. For i3 competition, one must mostly look outside of Germany to either Japan or America, for either the Nissan Leaf or Chevy Bolt. However, the oft-forgotten Audi A3 e-tron hails from Germany and attempts at competing with the i3. Though, the A3 e-tron is actually a plug-in hybrid, rather than a purely BEV (Battery Electric Vehice) like the BMW i3. So how do the two German alternative fueled vehicles compare against each other? […]

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