Top Gear reviews the BMW 327 — The Z4’s Ancestor

Interesting, News | November 3rd, 2018 by 1
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We read a lot of BMW reviews, as you can imagine. Almost all of which are of modern cars, cars BMW currently sells. However, it’s …

We read a lot of BMW reviews, as you can imagine. Almost all of which are of modern cars, cars BMW currently sells. However, it’s rare to read a review of a classic car. Not a review from when the classic car was new but a review from today, of that very classic car. These sorts are my favorite, to be honest, as they look at our past through the lens of our present and it’s eye-opening. Which is why I clicked very quickly when I saw Top Gear recently reviewed a 1939 BMW 327.

The BMW 327 isn’t as well known as the famous 328, the latter of which famously won the Mille Migla, but it should be. It’s a beauty of a car, with a timeless design and engineering that was far ahead of its own time. The review of the BMW 327 is a bit short, unfortunately, but it’s well worth the read. TG also reviewed a BMW 328 in the same article, but it’s even shorter. The main story here is the 327, a car few enthusiasts know much about.

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Powered by a 2.0 liter (1,971 cc) inline six-cylinder engine that made a whopping 80 hp, which was a lot in its day, the 327 seems like a gem to drive. Its power isn’t going to allow it to keep up with modern cars but its smoothness and its noise seem make it more enjoyable. It’s paired with a four-speed manual gearbox, with an incredibly long shift lever, and is rear-wheel drive.

It’s a stunning car, the BMW 327, and one that reminds us of where BMW came from. It’s also incredible to look at the contrast between past and present. At the time, the BMW 327 was considered to be a luxurious, big-engine convertible. Which current BMW fits that bill? The M850i Convertible, with its 523 hp twin-turbocharged V8, all-wheel drive, eight-speed automatic gearbox, rear-wheel steering and adaptive dampers. The BMW 327 had a live rear axle with leaf springs. Things have come a long, long way.

[Source: Top Gear]
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