2014 BMW X5 xDrive30d Review

BMW X5 | August 30th, 2013 by 0
bmw x 5 007 x5 30d 2014 BMW X5 xDrive30d Review

The 2014 BMW X5 xDrive30d gets reviewed by AutoExpress. While the U.S. won’t get the 30d model, diesel aficionados on this side of the pond …

The 2014 BMW X5 xDrive30d gets reviewed by AutoExpress. While the U.S. won’t get the 30d model, diesel aficionados on this side of the pond will get to enjoy the more powerful xDrive35d.

The 2014 BMW X5 xDrive35d retains the 3.0-liter diesel engine, whose BMW TwinPower Turbo technology comprises VNT turbocharging and common rail direct injection, now develops maximum power of 255 hp and maximum torque of 413 lb-ft which is delivered between 1,500 and 3,000 rpm.

Here is the review from AutoExpress:

bmw x 5 080 x5 30d 655x436 2014 BMW X5 xDrive30d Review

We tried the xDrive 30d, which is as punchy as ever with all the performance you’re likely to need. It sounds familiar too – a distant gruff growl, which gathers into a more distinct snarl as you press hard on the throttle. The extra grunt leads to sharper acceleration – the 0-62mph time drops by 0.7- to 6.9 seconds – but fuel economy and CO2 emissions have improved by 7.4mpg and 31g/km to 45.6mpg and 164g/km.

The X5 has always had impressive handling for a car of its size, and the new model continues the trend. All new X5s will be fitted as standard with BMW’s Driving Experience Control, a toggle switch that lets the driver switch between Comfort, Sport, Sport+ and Eco Pro modes.

Comfort really is comfortable, bringing to the X5 a fluidity and level of bump absorption that simply wasn’t present in the old version. Even in Sport mode (Sport+ has the same level of damper stiffness but dials out the assistance from the ESP and traction control) this new X5 has a level of comfort that would have been utterly alien to its predecessor. Unfortunately that means it can’t match the steering feel and chassis responses of its predecessor.

The electrically-boosted steering has a lovely weighty feel to it, but it fails to transmit precisely what the front tyres are up to. As the cornering forces build, things improve, and there’s still a level of agility only the Porsche Cayenne can beat and the Range Rover Sport can equal. But it’s still not quite the drivers’ car it was.

Full review

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