Advertisement

More Rumors: No manual transmission in next generation BMW M5

Rumors | June 21st, 2012 by 9
BMW-M5_UK_Version_2012_1600x1200_wallpaper_31

BMW rumor week continues today with another episode: no manual transmission in the next generation BMW M5. The new F10 M5 will arrive to U.S. …

BMW rumor week continues today with another episode: no manual transmission in the next generation BMW M5. The new F10 M5 will arrive to U.S. dealerships in the upcoming weeks, but InsideLine is already reporting on the next iteration which will occur in 7 years from now. Albert Biermann, Head of M Engineering, told the U.S. outlet that there are no plans to fit three pedals in the next generation M5 and M6 models due to the low adoption rate:

“Last year, maybe 15-20 percent of our M5s in the U.S. were manuals and maybe this year it will be 15 percent. It’s declining,” Biermann warned.

“The trouble is that nobody wants it in Europe or anywhere else, so this will be the last time we do it, even for the hard-core U.S. buyers.”

More Rumors: No manual transmission in next generation BMW M5

The transmission of choice will be the double-clutch gearbox.

To handle the increased power and torque in the F10 M5, the six-speed manual found in this year’s M5 was heavily reworked from the 5 Series models and will be only offered, optionally, to U.S. customers. Same box will make its way into the 2012 and 2013 M6 Coupe and Convertible.

“We just can’t justify it anymore. It’s a no-cost option, but it’s been very difficult to do,” said Biermann.

“Theoretically the stick is cheaper, but it’s very low volumes and we have to strengthen everything in the gearbox and find space for the shifter and another pedal, so it doesn’t work out cheaper.”

But these rules don’t apply to the bread and butter of the M division: the M3. Biermann said that the M3 “needs to have a stick shift.” To emphasize even more on the importance of the manual box for the M3, he added “It will always have a stick shift.”

So there you have it, either a rumor or not, we believe that it’s a bit too early for the final conclusion to be made, but coming from the Head of M Engineering himself, the rumor might actually become reality.

More Rumors: No manual transmission in next generation BMW M5

  • xcore

    it makes sense, when you makes a “sport car” like sedan upto the weight as a small suv, it turns down alot of people. meanwhile, threre isnt much “hardcore” owner would consider a 4000lbs pig a real sport car. even myself ,who DD into car installed with a twin disc clutch, wouldnt consider it as a real sport car. m5 is not the same as it used to be. honestly, i will miss the e39 era when every m5 is a stick and still possible turn into a real track at non-pro level.

    • JRobUSC

      Then those people won’t like ANY car in the M5 segment, since the M5, E63, S6, and CTS-V all weigh within 100lbs of each other. Funny how within all the vitriol the M5 has garnered regarding its stated curb weight, no one seems to mention that independent magazines who actually weighed the cars found they all basically overlap in weight. (in fact the true weight spread between the M5, S6, and E63 is only 44lbs).

      • LaMa

        and they still corner and handle better then the one they replaced (lighter)
        weight is one thing //M engineering is an another.
        the F10 M5 will run circles around the E39 and E60 even though it has a weight disadvantage. Not just by pure power, but pure handling !!!

        • Mike Bowman

          I agree with LaMa. You can go buy the older cars and have fun but in reality you will get dusted by a newer BMW. Today a bme 330 with dust my 95 M3. and…I have no problem with 414hp over 240 hp…DCT or no DCT…but, do online track times and you’ll see the DCT’s are pulling faster times

  • Pingback: More Rumors: No manual transmission in next generation BMW M5 | labmw.com

  • NemesiS

    Don’t do this BMW … the M5 is already turbocharged…don’t take away it’s soul.

    • Mike Bowman

      I have the DCT in my 08 M3 and absolutely LOVE IT! I have a 95 M3 with a manual and although I enjoy driving it I prefer the DCT. Something about the paddle shifters makes driving it extremely fun and, to be honest, you will not be able to shift faster than the DCT. Why do you think the Veyron comes in automatic? Don’t knock technology unless you’ve used it. Drive one and I think you’ll feel differently

      • Randy Jones

        So what? Are you going for the F1 World Championship? LeMans? 12 Hours of Sebring? A couple of tenths faster makes a difference on the track if you’re actually racing and maybe to fan boys oogling over numbers in a magazine. But that doesn’t mean squat on the street. The important thing is the driver’s connection to the car, that is what’s fun for 99.9% of the population. I’ve driven all forms of transmissions. The DCT is fun on the track but after a very short while the challenge and thrill is gone. I’ve been driving a manual for 20 years and the involvement is always there. People need to wake up and realize it’s the connection to the car that matters, not a couple tenths around a racetrack they’ll never compete on for anything meaningful. If you’re a track day junkie, the only thing you’re really competing against is yourself. You don’t need a DCT to compete against yourself. Keep the connection to the car!

  • Mateo

    I think Horatiu Boeriu forgot something!
    BMW M5 has no manual gearbox since 2003 (last e39 model). E60 manual was awful as much as I know, you needed to put gearbox into first gear in some corners to get max out of the engine which was bad (ref. cts-v vs m5 video) and after some time V10 gets into safety mode if you drive hard (ref. couple of reviews mention that).
    So, new M5 is also mainly “no manual” car so i don’t think F10M5 manual will be good to drive. Its no problem to make manual but the whole car is made to be driven by double-clutch sistem.
    btw. who cares, this m5 is really a boat, huge and heavy car – you can see that bmw is getting to replace what used to be M5 with new M3 saloon.
    It was always M3 coupe and than saloon (e36/e90) but now m3 saloon will be the first M3 that will be presented as a 4-door saloon and not a coupe which will come later.
    m3 will become what M5 used to be!

    and i think theres another reason not to make manual, i read a lot of article which mention that gearbox was short lived in e39!

BMWBLOG

NEWSLETTER