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TheDieselDriver: 2011 BMW 335d Review and Final Drive

3-Series | October 29th, 2011 by 10
2011-bmw-335d

The diesel-centric magazine, TheDieselDriver publishes their final review of the 2011 BMW 335d. Let’s have a look. Since its launch in December 2008, BMW has …

The diesel-centric magazine, TheDieselDriver publishes their final review of the 2011 BMW 335d. Let’s have a look.

Since its launch in December 2008, BMW has sold 8,217 335d sedans in the U.S.  In the same time period, BMW sold 14,532 335i sedans, which means that one out of every three buyers (36% to be exact) chose the diesel variant.

To celebrate the 335d’s successful run, we wanted to drive it in its native habitat, Germany.  Since it wasn’t practical to ship our 335d back to Europe for one last trip, we drove a 2011 335d sedan made for the German market

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We reached our destination in Stuttgart, the hotel Zauberlehrling (sorcerer’s apprentice) after a drive of 232 km (144 miles).

TheDieselDriver: 2011 BMW 335d Review and Final Drive

The overall fuel economy of 9.2 l/100 km (25.6 mpg) with an average speed of 87 km/h (54 mph) came nowhere close to our expectations although a good part of this can be accounted for by the fact that our driving was either in traffic with lots of braking or at very high speeds.

The final leg of the trip, Stuttgart Munich, was two days later, and we returned just in time for the first day of Oktoberfest. The 268 km (166 mile) trip took three and one-half hours with an average speed of 80.8 km/h (50 mph). The 335d used 7.9 l/100 km (29.77 mpg) and this trip also consisted of a mixture of traffic with braking or high-speed driving.

By contrast, while our 2010 BMW 335d averaged 6.5 l/100 km (36.2 mpg) across all of its highway trips, it averaged 7.5 l/100 km (31.4 mpg) on its first 500 km (310 mile) trip and fuel economy improved as the engine became more broken in. Since our 2011 335d was not even past the break-in period during these drives, it is likely that its fuel economy will greatly improve as well.”

Full review at TheDieselDriver

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  • Anonymous

    This is a car that could really use the 8-speed auto in it.  I don’t understand why BMW hasn’t done this yet.  

    • Guest

      Or a manual transmission.

      • Mirko Reinhardt

        You can get a 316d, 318d, 320d, 325d and 330d, 320d xDrive, 325d xDrive, 330d xDrive or Alpina D3 Biturbo with a manual transmission. Isn’t that enough? The 335d is 0.1 seconds slower to 60 than a manual 330d xDrive…

  • http://shoaibabdullah.com Shoaib Ibn Abdullah

    This car is awesome.

  • http://www.automotivepartsuppliers.com/ Automotive Parts Supplier

    it still amazes me that diesels haven’t caught on more in the states like they have in EU, it’s ridiculous how many diesels are over there. i heard somewhere around 40% of cars in EU are diesel.

    • Arwar

      and the number grows every day as new cars are bought they are mostly diesels. I would also buy a diesel BMW

  • SilverBullet

    Congress didnt want the new diesels. Excuse, “We want to give our domestic manufacturers an opportunity to get their hybrids into the marketplace first.” We manufacture VWs in this country which get 85mpg and ship 100% of them overseas. Why this paranoia about the high mileage cars by the Fed? FUEL TAXES!!! Plain and simple. Without the excessive fuel prices and the low mileage cars, the United States Government would already be bankrupt. Dont like this? Write or call your Congressman!!!

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