Car and Driver: 2012 BMW 650i Convertible Test Drive

6-series | September 11th, 2011 by 8
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US magazine Car and Driver reviews the all-new 2012 BMW 650i Convertible. Yours truly had the chance to drive the high-end convertible in Cabo, Mexico …

US magazine Car and Driver reviews the all-new 2012 BMW 650i Convertible. Yours truly had the chance to drive the high-end convertible in Cabo, Mexico and the full review can be found here. The redesigned and highly acclaimed luxury cabriolet went on sale this June with a base price starting at $91,375, including Destination & Handling.

Targeting a demographic group that includes 65% female buyers, the redesigned convertible is longer, wider and offers more room than its predecessor. The car comes equipped with BMW’s latest technology, from safety to comfort and performance.

Without any further ado, let’s have a look at the review by Car and Driver.

Car and Driver: 2012 BMW 650i Convertible Test Drive

“We cried foul after the company fitted the 5-series with a new electric power-steering system, as it deprives the driver of any feel through that most important of automotive interfaces. Now BMW has fitted the 6er with this system. It’s like there’s a rogue faction within Bayerische Motoren Werke that is trying to scuttle the mothership. We’re particularly disappointed because the setup otherwise has everything we want in really good steering: immediacy and satisfying weight. The steering effort is variable via the 6’s standard Driving Dynamics Control system, but none of the settings (Comfort, Normal, Sport or Sport+) results in any communication.

Fortunately, although Driving Dynamics Control adjusts the damping, too, the Bavarians have yet to make an electric power chassis. Even if you can’t feel what the front tires are doing, this 4569-pound convertible’s balance will widen eyes and restore some of the confidence sapped by the lifeless tiller. At the ragged edge, though, this ragtop loses its poise a bit, getting a little squirrelly. After the skidpad test—in which the 650i scored an impressive 0.89 g—our test driver called it a “drift machine.” A 167-foot stop from 70 mph also nurses courage, as does the brake pedal’s firm, predictable feel. Its travel might be long for some, but it’s hard to fault BMW for making the brakes easy to modulate.”

Full review

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