Spied: 2012 BMW M5 with manual transmission

Spy Photos | June 14th, 2011 by 17
IMG 0313 thumb 717x562 90486 717x500

Not that we needed any visual confirmation, but the now long-time rumored 2012 BMW M5 with manual transmission has just been spotted on US soil. …

Not that we needed any visual confirmation, but the now long-time rumored 2012 BMW M5 with manual transmission has just been spotted on US soil. The fellows at InsideLine spied a F10 M5 prototype with a stick shift during the usual daily testing.

Between June 23 and 26th, 2011, BMW will host an M Festival to celebrate the 24hr race at the Nurburgring race track.

On this occasion, BMW invites fans around the world to have a look behind the scenes at the famous race and also visit the playground where every M car is developed and tested. The new 2012 BMW M5 will also be introduced at this event.

IMG 0305 655x499

Full details around the powerplant remain unknown, but we learned in the past that the 2012 BMW M5 is powered by an updated version of the S63 engine found in the BMW X5 M and X6 M. The 4.4-liter V8 twin-scroll powerplant will peak at somewhere in the 570-horsepower range and 530 lb-ft of torque. The 0-62 mph dash should take about 4.4 seconds,

The updated unit delivers both performance and efficiency significantly increased in comparison to the previous engine. Numerous drivetrain innovations and other enhancements have lead to a reduction in fuel consumption and emission levels by more than 25 percent.

The new engine is mated mated to a 7-speed M double-clutch transmission with Drivelogic. The combination of the new engine with M Drivelogic is supplemented by an Auto Start Stop function. As seen in the spy photos above, manual option will be offered for US customers.

The super sporty sedan goes on sale in early 2012 and it is rumored to have a base price around $100,000 mark.

IMG 0313 thumb 717x562 90486 655x513

17 responses to “Spied: 2012 BMW M5 with manual transmission”

  1. Grasso06 says:

    $100k, really? The last one was about $85k. The current non-M F10s didn’t jump in price, so why would the M jump $15k?!

    • Demolisher54 says:

      holy cowwww… 100k is a lot of money $$$$$… rather buy an R8 or a GT-R

      • But will it fit 5 people plus cargo in its spacious 18cu ft trunk and still go near 200 MPH.

      • Ahmad Haziq says:

        R8 and the GTR is a supercar, but this one right here is a super-saloon. You’ll be able to fit 5 people and a massive trunk as Daniel said yet still able to do more than 200mph and corners brilliantly. So, a 100k R8 or a 100k M5? You choose…

      • wazon8 says:

        You obviously don’t get the point of such cars as M5: they are supposed to be saloons with plenty of space and still provide decent performance. If someone was advising me to take GT-R, while I was looking for car from M5 segment, I would take him to be totally confused about the issue I’m talking about. You seem to realize this very feature.

      • wazon8 says:

        You obviously don’t get the point of such cars as M5: they are supposed to be saloons with plenty of space and still provide decent performance. If someone was advising me to take GT-R, while I was looking for car from M5 segment, I would take him to be totally confused about the issue I’m talking about. You seem to realize this very feature.

    • Ahmad Haziq says:

      Obviously they put a lot more engineering and that V8 TT development is part of it… I believe that’s the reason it’s getting more and more expensive. No doubt about that anyway.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Major company provide what is called “Auto Insurance Clearance” reduce the rates for long-time auto insurance customers. They just now reduced my rates! need to save money gas prices is killing my travel

  3. StraightSix says:

    I have a wierd opinion but I think stick shifter works best with N/A engines. What good is manual if you hit from fifth to fourth and wait two seconds of turbo lag? The charm of stick shifter is that you have absolute control over the N/A engine at all times and at critical moments when power must be immediate, like when passing the car ahead of you. Is this still possible with forced induction?

    • wazon8 says:

      Two seconds turbo lag? You had to drive rather shitty tyrbocharged engine. The whole point of introducing small twin scroll or two small turbocharges is to reduce this very effect and let the engine react almost immidiately on your commands. What you seem to refer to are recklessly designed turbocharged engines in which pretty big turbo charger is applied and which needs some time to create any boost, but surely neither of BMW’s recent turbocharged engines belong to this class. 

      BTW, you shouldn’t get two sec. turbo lag even when big turbo charger is applied, if you will change gears enough fast to keep turbo charger running. While accelerating and changing gear on higher you shouldn’t notice such huge turbo lag, but what’s impornant is to change in such a way that rev. are still above the rpm at which engine has its max trogue. If you’re reducing and turbo charger was running well on higher gear, you shouldn’t also notice such turbo lag on lower gear. Where you will notice turbo lag is standing start, because cars with relatively big turbochager has their max. torgue at higher rpm (say, 1900 or 2100) and before reaching it they are rather clumsy because of poor boost created by turbo charger up to this rpm point; and where you let turbo charger to “calm down” by minimalising openning angle of throttle, then it will need some time to reach proper speed and create boost. Of course, the time of reaction is never as fast as in N/A engines with proper software. At least it seems true to me as a user of numbers of turbo charged and N/A engines. 

  4. Lexus LVR says:

    And 90% of “BMW enthusiasts” can’t even drive stick. These are the same people who claim they’re BMW fans but only like the M cars. These are the same people who claim “A 4-cylinder BMW is not a real BMW” yet adore the 1st generation M3 without knowing what’s powering that car…

    • MathewBMW says:

      And the funniest thing about “BMW enthusiasts”… they all memorized that the “flawless” S85 engine from E60 M5 is much, much better than the new TwinPower Turbo S63. It sounds better, it revs higher, it’s normally aspirated, and yes, they’re quite right. 

      But I’m not a BMW E60 M5 owner, I’m just a (big) fan of the 5.0 liters V10 derived from BMW F1 car. Owner’s complaint involve autonomy, lack of torque ()and the “racing transmission” (7-speed SMG-III). Let’s think a little… so why didn’t BMW M increased the displacement and changed the SMG-III to the new M-DCT? Because BMW Group have a new perspective: EfficientDynamics. They’re changing the whole philosophy of true sports cars. Look at the FWD future models, the TwinPower Turbo, the BMW i… we have here the same issue as Lotus? Are they right?

    • MathewBMW says:

      And the funniest thing about “BMW enthusiasts”… they all memorized that the “flawless” S85 engine from E60 M5 is much, much better than the new TwinPower Turbo S63. It sounds better, it revs higher, it’s normally aspirated, and yes, they’re quite right. 

      But I’m not a BMW E60 M5 owner, I’m just a (big) fan of the 5.0 liters V10 derived from BMW F1 car. Owner’s complaint involve autonomy, lack of torque ()and the “racing transmission” (7-speed SMG-III). Let’s think a little… so why didn’t BMW M increased the displacement and changed the SMG-III to the new M-DCT? Because BMW Group have a new perspective: EfficientDynamics. They’re changing the whole philosophy of true sports cars. Look at the FWD future models, the TwinPower Turbo, the BMW i… we have here the same issue as Lotus? Are they right?

  5. NTI says:

    in the Brazil this car cost 500k

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

NEWSLETTER