BMW – One of the first automakers to make use of advanced steel

Interesting | December 22nd, 2010 by 6
steel_works

According to a report by Automotive News, BMW and Honda are considered industry leaders in the use of advanced steel. BMW was one of the …

According to a report by Automotive News, BMW and Honda are considered industry leaders in the use of advanced steel.

BMW was one of the first automakers to use the new advanced steel, available now across many models. The 7 Series uses roughly 400 pounds of it per vehicle. The new advanced steel helps the automakers tackle on the issue of added weight with every new model.

AutoNews reports the average vehicle built in North America contains 151 pounds of advanced high-strength steel, up from 111 pounds in 2007.

BMW   One of the first automakers to make use of advanced steel

Dick Schultz of Ducker Worldwide, a consulting firm in suburban Detroit, predicts the usage of advanced steel being increased by 10 to 15 percent annually over the next five years.

The new stronger steel has a direct impact on the vehicle’s structure by allowing automakers to use lighter components complementing the new steel.

The full report can be found at Auto News.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001688446429 Giom Mouton

    BMW leading once again!

    The one thing that I’m not sure about, is if the advanced steel is lighter than the steel/aluminum chassis of the previous five. Anybody know this?

    • bob

      What’s preventing you from doing a little research and finding out???

    • Otto

      Steel is lighter than aluminium but lead is even lighter. Next step for BMW is the introduction of enhanced lead in their whole range. That should put BMW (light) years ahead of Audi and MB.

  • bob

    No news like *old news*!

    Anyone who follows BMW closely will know that that’s what they’ve always done — finding the most cost-effective solution, with respect to materials, in getting the job done well.

    The E85 is a great example. As one could imagine, with any roadster application, the A-pillars are key. This excellent book highlights the use of various steels (& alumium), throughout its platform.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=ZgH9AHSrXu8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=0975498401&source=bl&ots=kfn3uUaWc1&sig=AC-BSBpJ3_738pUXdMBPw-6b40w&hl=en&ei=QI0STbWoJJGWsgPlpbTvCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

    On p. 43, there’s a wonderful color-coded diagram featuring the high-strength steels used:

    “In all, the use of high strength steel: 60% 180-260 N/mm^2
    and 11% with more than than 260 N/mm^2. The remaining
    29% of the body is built using normal strength steel having
    less than 180 N/mm^2.”

    Its development was over ten(10) years ago!

    Going back further…nearly twenty five(25) years ago…there was the Z1. A ground-breaking masterpiece(!), in the area of applied materials, by BMW Technik GmbH.

    Beyond roadsters, the story is basically no different with other BMW series models. While their A-pillars are not of such primary concern, there are a multitude of areas where high strength steels are used for structural integrity.

    • Otto

      Interesting. That certainly explains why the Z8 frame was made of aluminium

  • http://www.spford.com/ Carrollton Used Cars

    I wonder if this is the same as Boron steel… I read that a lot of car manufacturers use that since it’s the strongest steel but I am guessing this is a different type of steel since it has the intention of making the car light weight. Either way BMW is quite on the cutting edge and I like that.

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