Edmunds drives the 2011 BMW 335i Coupe Facelift

3-Series | March 24th, 2010 by 8
2011 bmw 3series actf34 fd 309101 815 750x500 Edmunds drives the 2011 BMW 335i Coupe Facelift

The folks over at Edmunds InsideLine had the opportunity to drive the new 2011 BMW 335i Coupe Facelift, or LCI if you would use BMW’s …

The folks over at Edmunds InsideLine had the opportunity to drive the new 2011 BMW 335i Coupe Facelift, or LCI if you would use BMW’s own buzzword.

Here is an excerpt from their review:

“We tested the midlife 335i coupe and convertible with the dual-clutch Getrag rather than the ZF-built six-speed automatic manual that will be the U.S. option for this car. That’s because the Europeans can have any transmission they darn well want in the 3 Series, while BMW North America wants to reserve the Getrag for more exclusive models like the 335is and M3.

2011 bmw 3series actf34 fd 309101 815 655x436 Edmunds drives the 2011 BMW 335i Coupe Facelift

But, as already written, there’s more than just a different tranny to the revised 3 Series. The N55 inline-6 puts up the same power and torque numbers as the N54 twin-turbo, only now with less mechanical effort and fewer CO2 emissions. The N55 combines direct fuel injection, variable valve timing and a single BorgWarner twin-scroll turbocharger that can deliver peak boost of 10 psi.

So, yes, BMW has been scooching around various technical pieces in the 3 Series formula as if they were chess pieces in order to create a new, upper level of 3 Series cars. To our thinking, the new 335i and 335is are different enough to warrant one another’s existence. (Is the $7,000 extra for the 335is warranted? Well, can’t decide that one since it’s up to them what buy ‘em.)

One more subtle change to be seen first in this 2011 BMW 335i is the use of Sachs dampers at all corners. The objective is a more linear cycle of compression and rebound across the low-speed bumps in town, as well as over the high-speed bumps of the highway. The system of coil spring and piston within the dampers has given way to a stack of thin washerlike discs that produce more progressive fluid flow and less vibration over everyday pavement imperfections. (GM has used this technology in the U.S. for years.) We can attest that we felt the difference and also that none of the goodness on the sporty side of the equation has been lost.”

Full Review at InsideLine

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