MINI E – Huge mileage drop in cold weather?

Rumors | December 29th, 2009 by 2
MINI E battery

One of the stories tonight on some of the most popular technology related websites, revolves around the MINI E, the first electric car designed by …

One of the stories tonight on some of the most popular technology related websites, revolves around the MINI E, the first electric car designed by BMW. According to an unconfirmed report by CrunchGear, some of the MINI E testers are seeing significant mileage drop in cold weather. The cold weather effect is similar to any other battery powered devices that see a quick decrease in charge levels if left out in the cold.

The report mentions the overall driving range being reduced by 50% in 23 degrees temperatures. While the findings might be somewhat troublesome for MINI E owners, in BMW”s defense, we have to mention that the MINI Electric program is conducted as a field trial and only a few selected hundred people are enjoying their first all-electric car.

As a quick recap, the MINI E is powered by a 150 kW (204 hp) electric motor fed by a high-performance rechargeable lithium-ion battery, transferring its power to the front wheels via a single-stage helical gearbox nearly without a sound and entirely free of emissions. Specially engineered for automobile use, the battery has (in perfect testing) a range of more than 250 kilometers, or 156 miles.

MINI E   Huge mileage drop in cold weather?

The MINI E’s electric drive train produces a peak torque of 220 Newton meters, delivering seamless acceleration to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 8.5 seconds. Top speed is electronically limited to 152 km/h (95 mph).

Currently, BMW is conducting field trials in the U.S., Germany and UK.

Since the reports are not being officially confirmed at this time, we’re going to leave them at the rumor level for now, but it will be interesting to hear more from an engineer with knowledge in the matter.

[Source: CrunchGear ]

  • Doug

    Hmm… .maybe they ought not to charge the batteries when they’re cold; aren’t those the normal instructions for rechargable batteries (laptops etc) ? It could be that they’re actually damaging the batteries, or accelerating the logarithmic decay.

  • http://n/a JoeDoe

    Besides, wasn’t one of the preconditions for getting a Mini-E that you have a garage where the Mini can be charged? So if you make sure your garage isn’t completely freezing when the charging starts, it will be ok. The charging process itself further heats up the battery, as does driving it, so it seems there is only a problem if you leave it out in the cold or start charging the batteries when they’re pretty much frozen.

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