MotorTrend drove the upcoming BMW 750i xDrive

7-series | June 26th, 2009 by 2
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MotorTrend is the first car magazine to drive the not-yet released BMW 750i xDrive. The new 7 equipped with the BMW all-wheel drive system was …

MotorTrend is the first car magazine to drive the not-yet released BMW 750i xDrive. The new 7 equipped with the BMW all-wheel drive system was just officially announced yesterday and we’re pleased to see the first test drive.

BMW xDrive will be available for the first time also in a BMW 7 Series model. In the BMW 750i xDrive and the BMW 750Li xDrive this permanent, electronically controlled all-wheel drive ensures appropriate distribution of the power of 300 kW/407 hp generated by the V8 with its BMW TwinPower Turbo Technology, thus catering for all demands in every situation.

While it all sounds exciting and intriguing, we do have one concern: how much weight would the xDrive system add to the 7?

But before we can find out the answer, let’s see what MotorTrend thinks of this new 750i xDrive:

MotorTrend drove the upcoming BMW 750i xDrive

While it shares a lot in common with BMW’s xDrive AWD applications already seen on the 3 and 5 Series, its operation has undergone a lot of rethinking.

Previously, the front/rear torque split of, say, the 535i xDrive was relentlessly held at around 40/60, unless problematic understeer or oversteer was discerned. With the 750i xDrive (AWD’s first 7-Series appearance, by the way) its nominal 40/60 split can fluidly change to 20/80 as you transition to the middle of a corner, the result being a sensation of less understeer and more steering authority.

Realize, too, that this occurs during perfectly normal driving. If understeer does develop, a system already available on the rear-drive 750i can lightly drag the inside rear wheel’s brake while carefully adding power to the rear axle so you don’t detect any braking effect. If oversteer occurs, the 20/80 torque split reshuffles more power to the front wheels. And on top of all this, the car’s adjustable front and rear anti-roll bars (already a feature of the rear-drive 750i) can redial the big sedan’s orientation as well.

Full article and photos at MotorTrend.com

  • Giom

    This the same mag that thrashed the 7 series a while back? They just proved themselves inadequate assessors of motor vehcles, because this write-up was very positive.

    • Gord

      It also depends on which journalist reviewed it.

      I think Motortrend actually liked it though.

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