BMW M3 Concept – First Impressions

BMW M3 | March 26th, 2007 by 0

The BMW M3 Concept, with its Chrome Shadow exterior finish, is a derivative of the new 3 Series Coupe. Features that make the M3 Concept …

The BMW M3 Concept, with its Chrome Shadow exterior finish, is a derivative of the new 3 Series Coupe.

Features that make the M3 Concept stand out are the bespoke front and rear bumper and spoiler designs, a bonnet with a bulging powerdome plus two air vents, side gills complete with M-designation on the front wings, side skirts and double strut exterior mirrors as seen on previous BMW M cars.

Conspicuous at the front are three large air intakes below the cooling grille that supply the engine with additional intake and cooling air. Strong, vertical struts delineate the air intakes and enhance their characteristic form. The aluminium engine compartment lid exhibits a wide, bulging powerdome. Like the air vents to either side of it, the powerdome hints at the great potential expected of the powerplant destined for the engine bay of any forthcoming all-new BMW M3. The M3 Concept features a high-revving V8 engine that could be used to power a car should it go into production.

The rear of the M3 Concept further enhances the muscular stance of the vehicle. A discreet spoiler lip on the boot lid, also called a Gurney flap, channels the air at the rear for optimum downforce while reducing lift on the rear axle. The M3 Concept is the latest showcase for BMW’s use of advanced weight saving technology and the clearest demonstration of this on the car is its roof. Specialists at the BMW Plant in Landshut, Germany, constructed the carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) roof using an exclusive production method taken from the firm’s experience in Formula One. Courtesy of a clear lacquer the carbon-fibre weave is still clearly visible.

Seen from the side, the roof edge appears flatter and thus lowers the perceived body height. Apart from the appearance, the CFRP roof also offers a real technical advantage being considerably lighter than a steel roof. This not only reduces the overall vehicle weight, but by reducing the weight of the highest element in the body, the centre of gravity is also lowered to produce a better balanced car.

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